How should I choose my Endovenous Laser Ablation provider?

Endovenous Laser Ablation . 9 answers . 4 years ago

I'm pretty sure I want to have my moderate varicose veins treated with ELA. What should I base my choice of a specialist on? Degrees earned, years of experience, before-and-after pictures, equipment used? What's truly important to a good result?

ANSWERS


4 years ago by General Vascular Surgery Group (View Profile)

Experience and case volume as well as the MDs results.

4 years ago by General Vascular Surgery Group (View Profile)

Experience and case volume as well as the MDs results.


4 years ago by Innovative Vein (View Profile)

Experience is certainly a good place to start. I would also try to speak with some former patients if possible. I would not get hung up on degrees and specialty so much. And if the physician is Board Certified in Phlebology that should also give you confidence.

4 years ago by Innovative Vein (View Profile)

Experience is certainly a good place to start. I would also try to speak with some former patients if possible. I would not get hung up on degrees and specialty so much. And if the physician is Board Certified in Phlebology that should also give you confidence.


4 years ago by Bella MD Laser Vein and Aesthetic Center (View Profile)

I would say to choose someone that can gain your trust through good communication and education.

4 years ago by Bella MD Laser Vein and Aesthetic Center (View Profile)

I would say to choose someone that can gain your trust through good communication and education.


4 years ago by Angelo N. Makris MD (View Profile)

I would suggest that experience with vain ablation is the most important factor. Choose someone who has done a lot (greater than 300 ablations).

4 years ago by Angelo N. Makris MD (View Profile)

I would suggest that experience with vain ablation is the most important factor. Choose someone who has done a lot (greater than 300 ablations).


4 years ago by VeinCare Centers of Tennessee (View Profile)

A physician who is detail-oriented and will spend the time to evaluate you and to educate you regarding management of your venous disease is important. While physicians of any specialty can learn to treat most problems with the superficial veins, some learn a broad range of skills from which to choose to meet your needs. Others are limited to performing only a few procedures because they have less experience, training, or desire to provide the broader range of services.
Any answer to your question will be controversial. Surgeons who are board certified in General Surgery or Vascular Surgery have advantages over other physicians, but they, too, must learn skills which few are taught during their surgical training. Certification by the American Board of Phlebology suggests that the physician is serious about treating superficial venous disease and should be viewed as a good sign.
If you know others who have been treated in your area or have a primary care physician who can advise you, this may give some insight into the experiences of others which may influence you.
If you do not sense that you are receiving a thorough evaluation or that your questions are not being answered, seek another opinion.

4 years ago by VeinCare Centers of Tennessee (View Profile)

A physician who is detail-oriented and will spend the time to evaluate you and to educate you regarding management of your venous disease is important. While physicians of any specialty can learn to treat most problems with the superficial veins, some learn a broad range of skills from which to choose to meet your needs. Others are limited to performing only a few procedures because they have less experience, training, or desire to provide the broader range of services.
Any answer to your question will be controversial. Surgeons who are board certified in General Surgery or Vascular Surgery have advantages over other physicians, but they, too, must learn skills which few are taught during their surgical training. Certification by the American Board of Phlebology suggests that the physician is serious about treating superficial venous disease and should be viewed as a good sign.
If you know others who have been treated in your area or have a primary care physician who can advise you, this may give some insight into the experiences of others which may influence you.
If you do not sense that you are receiving a thorough evaluation or that your questions are not being answered, seek another opinion.


4 years ago by Miller Vein (View Profile)

Experience is most important. You should look for a practioner who is fully dedicated to venous disease, as opposed to one who is dabbling in veins. Board certification in a specialty that relates to veins such as interventional radiology, general or vascular surgery as well as Board certification in phlebology indicates at least some degree of proficiency. Perhaps most important is what other patients say about the physician as well as your gut reaction to the office.

4 years ago by Miller Vein (View Profile)

Experience is most important. You should look for a practioner who is fully dedicated to venous disease, as opposed to one who is dabbling in veins. Board certification in a specialty that relates to veins such as interventional radiology, general or vascular surgery as well as Board certification in phlebology indicates at least some degree of proficiency. Perhaps most important is what other patients say about the physician as well as your gut reaction to the office.


4 years ago by Vanish Vein and Laser Center (View Profile)

Your decision to be treated should be based on several factors-most importantly is experience. I used to tell the surgical residents that experience and common sense are two things that cannot be taught. I would also look for board certification in general or vascular surgery and for someone who has a dedicated vein practice and is considered a Vein
Specialist, not someone just doing veins secondarily as part of a different practice. Lastly, I would look for board certification in vein treatment by the American Board of Phlebology and certification in ultrasound as either an RVT, RPVI or RPhS.

4 years ago by Vanish Vein and Laser Center (View Profile)

Your decision to be treated should be based on several factors-most importantly is experience. I used to tell the surgical residents that experience and common sense are two things that cannot be taught. I would also look for board certification in general or vascular surgery and for someone who has a dedicated vein practice and is considered a Vein
Specialist, not someone just doing veins secondarily as part of a different practice. Lastly, I would look for board certification in vein treatment by the American Board of Phlebology and certification in ultrasound as either an RVT, RPVI or RPhS.


4 years ago by The Kimmel Institute (View Profile)

You should go to someone who truly specializes in vascular disease, preferably a vascular surgeon. Many people (doctors) buy a laser and try to make some extra money on the side treating veins. This is unacceptable. Call around to find a pleasant office staff, a board certified vascular surgeon who actually performs the surgery him/herself, and has at least some experience in terms of how long he/she has been treating veins and how many procedures he/she has done. There are a lot of cardiologists (heart specialists), radiologists (who read x-rays and such), dermatologists (skin doctors) and even family doctors who want to treat your veins. Be advised! If you have a complication, make sure the person taking care of you can treat the complications, not send you to someone else (who should have treated you in the first place!).

4 years ago by The Kimmel Institute (View Profile)

You should go to someone who truly specializes in vascular disease, preferably a vascular surgeon. Many people (doctors) buy a laser and try to make some extra money on the side treating veins. This is unacceptable. Call around to find a pleasant office staff, a board certified vascular surgeon who actually performs the surgery him/herself, and has at least some experience in terms of how long he/she has been treating veins and how many procedures he/she has done. There are a lot of cardiologists (heart specialists), radiologists (who read x-rays and such), dermatologists (skin doctors) and even family doctors who want to treat your veins. Be advised! If you have a complication, make sure the person taking care of you can treat the complications, not send you to someone else (who should have treated you in the first place!).


4 years ago by Laser Vein Center (View Profile)

Perhaps most important is what other patients say about the physician as well as your gut reaction to the office.
Experience is also very important. You should look for a practioner who is fully dedicated to venous disease, as opposed to one who is dabbling in veins. Ideally the surgeon/physician should have done hundred of the ELA he is planning to perform. Board certification in a specialty that relates to veins such as interventional radiology, general or vascular surgery as well as Board certification in phlebology indicates at least some degree of proficiency.

4 years ago by Laser Vein Center (View Profile)

Perhaps most important is what other patients say about the physician as well as your gut reaction to the office.
Experience is also very important. You should look for a practioner who is fully dedicated to venous disease, as opposed to one who is dabbling in veins. Ideally the surgeon/physician should have done hundred of the ELA he is planning to perform. Board certification in a specialty that relates to veins such as interventional radiology, general or vascular surgery as well as Board certification in phlebology indicates at least some degree of proficiency.


Related Questions

Endovenous Laser Ablation - 4 years ago
I had EVLT about 10 days ago , now I have a big knot on my inner thigh and when I touch it, it still hurts , I had a lot of pain the day after the surgery and I couldn't bend my leg. Is this normal?
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 5 years ago
If I have had large vessels such as the saphenous closed, is there chance of circulatory problems later on?
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 3 years ago
I am just over 2 weeks post EVLT and still have pain. As long as I take an anti-inflammatory the pain subsides. Visually the inner thigh looks good. How much longer will the pain last?
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 4 years ago
Can you please detail some of the restrictions after EVLT?
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 2 years ago
It has been a week since my EVLT procedure, and I am wondering if I should continue wearing the compression stocking?
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 1 year ago
I have burning pain at my incision site 3 weeks after endovenous laser ablation. It isn't constant, just when it is touched or rubbed. Could this be nerve damage or a hair follicle that is irritated f...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 2 years ago
I had swelling in my left foot and my doctor confirmed that the valves in two of my veins were not working properly. I had these veins closed with endovenous laser ablation, but four weeks later I st...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 4 years ago
I had EVLT done about three months ago..right after the EVLT procedure i started feeling weird sensations in my ankle and now the pain seems to get worse every day? Could this pain be associated with...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 4 years ago
I am about two months into treatment for chronic venous insufficiency? I have had laser ablation and foam sclerotherapy with very little results. Can anything be done to treat lipodermatosclerosis aft...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 4 years ago
Or does the treatment permanently remove them?
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 5 years ago
I've heard that ELA can result in deep vein thrombosis. Is this true, and how common is this complication? Is there any way to prevent it?
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 5 years ago
I've heard that endovenous laser treatments actually remove or destroy the saphenous vein in the leg. Is this true, and will I still get enough blood circulation to the legs if this large vessel is r...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 3 years ago
I have sharp stabbing pains in my leg. It's very painful and the Motrin did not help. I was in tears! This went on for a couple of days. The pain is on my right leg and my left leg isn't painful at al...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 2 years ago
I had my GSV ablation done 13 days ago and still have intense pain in a segment on the inner thigh just above the knee. Is this level of pain normal and, if so, for how long? I have to take Advil for ...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 2 years ago
I have not had any heart problems other than high blood pressure, but family members have had heart catheters and heart surgery. I have leaking valves in the saphenous vein. If ablated, can other v...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 4 years ago
It's been a year since my surgery and I still have bruising. Does that mean it's permanent?
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 2 years ago
EVLT 5 days ago GSV. No serious pain yet. Compression stocking to come off tomorrow, but bruising seems excessive with dark patches and tenderness to touch. I was told to use heating pad, and now I'm ...
See More
Endovenous Laser Ablation - 4 years ago
Does this procedure hurt?
See More
Need Help?
Get answers from experienced doctors
Ask Now

Most Active Doctors


,

,

Recently Asked Questions