What is the best treatment for venous ulcers?

What is the recommended procedure for treating leg ulcers?

Answers from doctors (15)


It depends on the cause. If the ulcers are due to varicose veins, then treatment of the varicosities can help significantly in conjunction with a wound care specialist. If due to deep venous reflux, compression stockings and wound care are the best choices.

Answered by Columbia Doctors Interventional Radiology (View Profile)

It depends on the cause. If the ulcers are due to varicose veins, then treatment of the varicosities can help significantly in conjunction with a wound care specialist. If due to deep venous reflux, compression stockings and wound care are the best choices.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Cosmetic Vein Centers of Texas

Published on Nov 29, 2012

Correct any superficial venous reflux.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/554_1447800116.jpg
Answered by Cosmetic Vein Centers of Texas

Correct any superficial venous reflux.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Michael F. Gioscia, MD, FACS, ABVLM

Published on Nov 26, 2012

Venous stasis ulcers can be due to deep, superficial, and/ or perforator
vein incompetence; deep vein thrombosis can also be involved in the
etiology. Before recommending the "best" treatment, venous duplex scanning must be performed and a
comprehensive history and physical must be taken by an expert in the field of complex venous disorders. Perforator vein surgery (SEPS or RF ablation), superficial venous ablation, vein interruptions, or a combination of these treatments may be indicated.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1296_1408044092.jpg
Answered by Michael F. Gioscia, MD, FACS, ABVLM

Venous stasis ulcers can be due to deep, superficial, and/ or perforator
vein incompetence; deep vein thrombosis can also be involved in the
etiology. Before recommending the "best" treatment, venous duplex scanning must be performed and a
comprehensive history and physical must be taken by an expert in the field of complex venous disorders. Perforator vein surgery (SEPS or RF ablation), superficial venous ablation, vein interruptions, or a combination of these treatments may be indicated.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Center of Orange County

Published on Nov 23, 2012

The best treatment for venous ulcers consists of 2 parts, both applied as
soon as possible. First, the underlying cause should be identified and
treated. Second, proper compression with edema reduction and specialized
wound care is needed until the ulcer heals.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1015_1408044084.jpg
Answered by Vein Center of Orange County

The best treatment for venous ulcers consists of 2 parts, both applied as
soon as possible. First, the underlying cause should be identified and
treated. Second, proper compression with edema reduction and specialized
wound care is needed until the ulcer heals.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Milford Vascular Institute

Published on Nov 23, 2012

Venous ulcers need a multi-treatment approach. In addition to local wound care
and compression, the underlying cause of the venous ulcer must be addressed.
Most ulcers are caused by venous congestion related to "leaky" veins in your
legs. This condition is referred to as venous insufficiency. Treating the
venous insufficiency will not only help heal the ulcer, it will prevent
recurrence in the future.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1373_1445876067.jpg
Answered by Milford Vascular Institute

Venous ulcers need a multi-treatment approach. In addition to local wound care
and compression, the underlying cause of the venous ulcer must be addressed.
Most ulcers are caused by venous congestion related to "leaky" veins in your
legs. This condition is referred to as venous insufficiency. Treating the
venous insufficiency will not only help heal the ulcer, it will prevent
recurrence in the future.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Tulane Heart & Vascular Institute

Published on Nov 21, 2012

Venous ulcers are important and should have a clinic visit

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1316_1409862499.jpg
Answered by Tulane Heart & Vascular Institute

Venous ulcers are important and should have a clinic visit

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Bella MD Laser Vein and Aesthetic Center

Published on Nov 20, 2012

Venous ulcers usually require closure of the causative vein. This will heal the ulcer.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/772_1408044077.jpg
Answered by Bella MD Laser Vein and Aesthetic Center

Venous ulcers usually require closure of the causative vein. This will heal the ulcer.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Specialists

Published on Nov 20, 2012

Venous ulcers are wounds from any source (trauma, biopsy, bug bite) which fail to heal due to venous insufficiency and the edema which accompanies the problem. The higher than normal pressure in the superficial veins around the lower part of the leg, allows serum (water and protein) to seep through
the walls of the veins into the surrounding soft tissues. This fluid interferes with wound healing by making it difficult for oxygen to make it to the skin and also inhibits wound closing or contraction through outward
pressure. Diagnostic evaluation is the first step in determining whether there is something treatable, such as an incompetent saphenous vein. The superficial veins can be sealed if severe insufficiency is identified and this often facilitates more rapid closure of the venous ulcer. If the deep vein system is the problem, then therapy is typically conservative with compression hose or Unna boot wrap, elevation and ambulation with avoidance of prolonged sitting or standing. The key is to research and find an experienced vein specialist who recognizes that venous insufficiency is more than just varicose veins, and who has experience treating patients with venous ulcers.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/740_1408044075.jpg
Answered by Vein Specialists

Venous ulcers are wounds from any source (trauma, biopsy, bug bite) which fail to heal due to venous insufficiency and the edema which accompanies the problem. The higher than normal pressure in the superficial veins around the lower part of the leg, allows serum (water and protein) to seep through
the walls of the veins into the surrounding soft tissues. This fluid interferes with wound healing by making it difficult for oxygen to make it to the skin and also inhibits wound closing or contraction through outward
pressure. Diagnostic evaluation is the first step in determining whether there is something treatable, such as an incompetent saphenous vein. The superficial veins can be sealed if severe insufficiency is identified and this often facilitates more rapid closure of the venous ulcer. If the deep vein system is the problem, then therapy is typically conservative with compression hose or Unna boot wrap, elevation and ambulation with avoidance of prolonged sitting or standing. The key is to research and find an experienced vein specialist who recognizes that venous insufficiency is more than just varicose veins, and who has experience treating patients with venous ulcers.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


General Vascular Surgery Group

Published on Nov 20, 2012

Depends on the cause of the ulcer. Sometimes an ablation procedure may be helpful though.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/922_1408044082.jpg
Answered by General Vascular Surgery Group

Depends on the cause of the ulcer. Sometimes an ablation procedure may be helpful though.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Arizona Vein Specialists

Published on Nov 20, 2012

Venous ulcer treatment is like a three legged stool. Compression, wound care and normalization of venous hypertension. See a phlebology specialist for evaluation and ultrasound.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1365_1408044094.jpg
Answered by Arizona Vein Specialists

Venous ulcer treatment is like a three legged stool. Compression, wound care and normalization of venous hypertension. See a phlebology specialist for evaluation and ultrasound.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Clinic of North Carolina

Published on Nov 20, 2012

There is usually an underlying problem that is causing the ulcers. I would recommend an appointment for evaluation. In our office we do a complete evaluation, including an ultrasound, which looks at the underlying
veins and arteries. The ultrasound gives us a lot in information about the causes of ulcers. The evaluation is a covered benefit through insurance.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1172_1408044089.jpg
Answered by Vein Clinic of North Carolina

There is usually an underlying problem that is causing the ulcers. I would recommend an appointment for evaluation. In our office we do a complete evaluation, including an ultrasound, which looks at the underlying
veins and arteries. The ultrasound gives us a lot in information about the causes of ulcers. The evaluation is a covered benefit through insurance.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Specialties of St. Louis

Published on Nov 20, 2012

You should first be fully evaluated by an experienced vascular surgeon with a standing ultrasound for deep and superficial system incompetence. Most commonly, they can be caused by superficial vein reflux. The ulcer should be evaluated for depth, infection and size/location to rule out arterial problems also. An appropriate dressing should be used and compression therapy started (if not arterial). There are several types of hose specifically for those with ulcers. A thigh length hose may be appropriate if reflux originates in the thigh. Even the traditional Unna boot works well to start the healing process. If using compression, they can be worn 24 hours per day and removed for bathing and dressing change. For saphenous reflux we recommend laser ablation with ultrasound guided sclerotherapy to veins in the area of ulceration, if indicated. Compression should be at least 30-40 or 40-50 mmHg pressure.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/623_1499902138.jpg
Answered by Vein Specialties of St. Louis

You should first be fully evaluated by an experienced vascular surgeon with a standing ultrasound for deep and superficial system incompetence. Most commonly, they can be caused by superficial vein reflux. The ulcer should be evaluated for depth, infection and size/location to rule out arterial problems also. An appropriate dressing should be used and compression therapy started (if not arterial). There are several types of hose specifically for those with ulcers. A thigh length hose may be appropriate if reflux originates in the thigh. Even the traditional Unna boot works well to start the healing process. If using compression, they can be worn 24 hours per day and removed for bathing and dressing change. For saphenous reflux we recommend laser ablation with ultrasound guided sclerotherapy to veins in the area of ulceration, if indicated. Compression should be at least 30-40 or 40-50 mmHg pressure.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Pacific Vein Centers

Published on Nov 20, 2012

We have had tremendous results from a combination of Laser Ablation and Compression therapy. For most venous ulcers we have skin coverage within 4-6 weeks.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/694_1408044074.jpg
Answered by Pacific Vein Centers

We have had tremendous results from a combination of Laser Ablation and Compression therapy. For most venous ulcers we have skin coverage within 4-6 weeks.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Heart and Vein Center

Published on Nov 20, 2012

The patient needs a full evaluation of the venous circulation. If the patient has venous reflux (as most probably does), elimination of the venous reflux is crucial to help the healing and prevent recurrrent ulcers. The modalities to be used depend on the patient's anatomy of the venous system. Compression stockings are quite important as well.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/923_1408044082.jpg
Answered by Heart and Vein Center

The patient needs a full evaluation of the venous circulation. If the patient has venous reflux (as most probably does), elimination of the venous reflux is crucial to help the healing and prevent recurrrent ulcers. The modalities to be used depend on the patient's anatomy of the venous system. Compression stockings are quite important as well.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vanish Vein and Laser Center

Published on Nov 20, 2012

The best treatment for venous ulcers is to reduce the source of the venous hypertension causing the ulcer. This would require a thorough venous duplex exam to look at the GSV, LSV and perforators. Since the treatment of venous ulcers is a complex process, you should see someone who has experience treating these. Besides reducing venous hypertension via laser if necessary, long term treatment would be necessary with venous compression.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1053_1499982262.jpg
Answered by Vanish Vein and Laser Center

The best treatment for venous ulcers is to reduce the source of the venous hypertension causing the ulcer. This would require a thorough venous duplex exam to look at the GSV, LSV and perforators. Since the treatment of venous ulcers is a complex process, you should see someone who has experience treating these. Besides reducing venous hypertension via laser if necessary, long term treatment would be necessary with venous compression.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Related Questions for Compression Stockings

Compression Stockings -7 answers
And should you be physically active while wearing the crompression socks?
See More
Compression Stockings -15 answers
I am 21 weeks pregnant and my whole leg and feet really hurt. I only have knee-length compression hose. Can I sleep with them on?
See More
Compression Stockings -13 answers
How big of a size do compression stockings come in?
See More
Compression Stockings -10 answers
I got knee surgery and have been wearin the socks for 3 weeks with some rests a day. I walk on my leg so blood circulates and crutches help me in public. Is it safe to not wear the stockings at all anymore? I just really don't want a blood clot.
See More
Compression Stockings -11 answers
Do you recommend wearing compression stockings on long flights? I have two flights: one 8 hours with a break of 12 hours and continuing another 12 hours after. I have store bought knee highs and thigh highs. Any disadvantages?
See More
Compression Stockings -7 answers
I had the procedure this morning and wore the compression stockings all day but I can't remember if the Dr. said to wear them when I sleep?
See More
Compression Stockings -12 answers
I wear compression stockings for varicose veins during my pregnancy. They ease the pain and tiredness, but my legs get so itchy sometimes - especially after I take my stockings off. What can i do to prevent the itchiness and are they too tight?
See More
Compression Stockings -12 answers
I was wondering if someone who already has a clot wore compression stockings, would it be safe? Might this dislodge the clot? I only just learned about compression stockings and I'm not sure of these details.
See More
Compression Stockings -9 answers
The knee highs are so much more comfortable. Are they effective enough?
See More
Get answers from our experienced doctors.
How it works
Compression Stockings -9 answers
I'm wondering if the pressure from compression stockings can harm the fetus?
See More
Compression Stockings -4 answers
How long after starting to wear these, will I see results?My calve has improved, but the ankle is still huge and the foot quite puffy.
See More
Compression Stockings -8 answers
I presently suffer from a sciatica for the 1st time. Lots of pain in my calf area and particularly in one pinpoint spot in the calf along with hip/groin pain.I wonder if stockings will help my calf pain and is it safe at 20/30 compression?Thank you
See More
Compression Stockings -6 answers
If I have problems with just one leg, can I wear one compression knee high or should I wear both?
See More
Compression Stockings -8 answers
What are the differences? Is it worth the additional cost?
See More
Compression Stockings -9 answers
It seems like tight clothes wouldn't benefit circulation.
See More
Compression Stockings -8 answers
I would like "save" my legs and buy compression stockings. I dont have any other medical problems that would require me to use the stockings other that I am a nurse and am on my feet a lot. What level of comrpession would you recommend I start with?
See More
Compression Stockings -13 answers
I am wearing compression stockings and was wondering how long should I wear them? Six and a half weeks after my C-section, I am still not mobile much.
See More
Compression Stockings -8 answers
My vascular surgeon did an ultrasound and prescribed endovenous laser ablation. She also suggested that I wear compression stockings after the procedure. However, due to severe psoriasis and eczema on my feet, I cannot wear full-coverage stockings that cover them. They must always be in wet dressings, but cannot be fully covered. Would footless compression stockings be just as effective as full-coverage hose following the procedure?
See More
Get answers from our experienced doctors.
How it works

Related Articles

Have specific questions?
ASK A DOCTOR