I have a varicose vein that runs down my thigh, is sclerotherapy the best procedure for this?

I am a 25-year-old female who is a runner. There is a varicose vein that runs from the middle of my thigh down to the mid-calf. Is sclerotherapy an effective option?

Answers from doctors (18)


More About Doctor Western Vascular Institute

Published on Aug 12, 2020

The procedure that seems like it might be most effective for you would be a radio-frequency ablation procedure. Generally, sclerotherapy is used to treat small sections of vein or more superficial vessels. The RFA procedure might be more effective at removing the vein and any additional problems that might be below the surface of the skin.

Answered by Western Vascular Institute (View Profile)

The procedure that seems like it might be most effective for you would be a radio-frequency ablation procedure. Generally, sclerotherapy is used to treat small sections of vein or more superficial vessels. The RFA procedure might be more effective at removing the vein and any additional problems that might be below the surface of the skin.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Center for Vein Care and Surgery

Published on Apr 10, 2013

This distribution may be coming off of the great saphenous vein. An ultrasound can be performed to detect if venous reflux is present and contributing to this varicose vein. If this is the case, vein closure in my opinion is the best initial choice of treatment of this varicose vein because the source is being treated. If sclerotherapy is performed initially on this vein, there is a good chance the vein will not go away or could come back. If there is no saphenous reflux, then treating with sclerotherapy may be effective.

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Answered by Center for Vein Care and Surgery

This distribution may be coming off of the great saphenous vein. An ultrasound can be performed to detect if venous reflux is present and contributing to this varicose vein. If this is the case, vein closure in my opinion is the best initial choice of treatment of this varicose vein because the source is being treated. If sclerotherapy is performed initially on this vein, there is a good chance the vein will not go away or could come back. If there is no saphenous reflux, then treating with sclerotherapy may be effective.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Chuback Vein Center

Published on Apr 04, 2013

Sclerotherapy is most commonly used for smaller veins/spider veins (those less than 5 mm in diameter.) Consulting with a vein specialist and having an ultrasound should be your first step. If the varicose vein has reflux or damage, they may suggest a minimally invasive vein treatment for you (for example, EVLT or ambulatory phlebectomy.)

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Answered by Chuback Vein Center

Sclerotherapy is most commonly used for smaller veins/spider veins (those less than 5 mm in diameter.) Consulting with a vein specialist and having an ultrasound should be your first step. If the varicose vein has reflux or damage, they may suggest a minimally invasive vein treatment for you (for example, EVLT or ambulatory phlebectomy.)

Published on Jul 11, 2012


The Sheen Vein Institute

Published on Mar 29, 2013

Sclerotherapy is a viable option. However, I would recommend a thorough ultrasound evaluation of your venous system to determine where this vessel starts/ends and if there are any other issues going on internally. Your vein physician needs to know what to treat and what not to treat. I would not want anyone just injecting into the vessel without knowing its origin. Doing so could result in collateral damage to adjacent vessels that you may or may not want treated.

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Answered by The Sheen Vein Institute

Sclerotherapy is a viable option. However, I would recommend a thorough ultrasound evaluation of your venous system to determine where this vessel starts/ends and if there are any other issues going on internally. Your vein physician needs to know what to treat and what not to treat. I would not want anyone just injecting into the vessel without knowing its origin. Doing so could result in collateral damage to adjacent vessels that you may or may not want treated.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein 911

Published on Mar 16, 2013

Sclerotherapy may be the best option, and maybe even the most effective option. However, the only way to determine that would be to have an ultrasound mapping study properly performed and interpreted.

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Answered by Vein 911

Sclerotherapy may be the best option, and maybe even the most effective option. However, the only way to determine that would be to have an ultrasound mapping study properly performed and interpreted.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


More About Doctor Laser Vein Center

Published on Mar 15, 2013

Yes, sclerotherapy would be the best treatment for your varicose veins.

Answered by Laser Vein Center (View Profile)

Yes, sclerotherapy would be the best treatment for your varicose veins.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Sclerotherapy is for treatment of spider veins. If you have a varicose vein (very common in runners), you need a more involved treatment like ablation and phlebectomy. You should have an evaluation done. Most insurance companies require patients to wear compression stockings (hose) for 3 months before they will pay for the treatment. Make sure you keep this in mind.

Answered by The Vascular Institute at Teton Radiology (View Profile)

Sclerotherapy is for treatment of spider veins. If you have a varicose vein (very common in runners), you need a more involved treatment like ablation and phlebectomy. You should have an evaluation done. Most insurance companies require patients to wear compression stockings (hose) for 3 months before they will pay for the treatment. Make sure you keep this in mind.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


General Vascular Surgery Group

Published on Mar 15, 2013

Depending on the size and the underlying source of the vein, sclerotherapy may be an option.

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Answered by General Vascular Surgery Group

Depending on the size and the underlying source of the vein, sclerotherapy may be an option.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


This question is best answered after an experienced physician examines you. An examination should include a Duplex ultrasound.

Answered by Advanced Vein & Laser Centre, Ltd. (View Profile)

This question is best answered after an experienced physician examines you. An examination should include a Duplex ultrasound.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Arizona Vein Specialists

Published on Mar 14, 2013

You most likely have venous insufficiency in the great saphenous vein that supplies the varicosity (varicose vein). See a vein specialist for an evaluation and duplex ultrasound to find out if this is the case before any treatment is started. Avoid running without a gradient support stocking.

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Answered by Arizona Vein Specialists

You most likely have venous insufficiency in the great saphenous vein that supplies the varicosity (varicose vein). See a vein specialist for an evaluation and duplex ultrasound to find out if this is the case before any treatment is started. Avoid running without a gradient support stocking.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Specialists

Published on Mar 14, 2013

I would suggest a diagnostic ultrasound to identify the source of the varicose vein. Typically, a varicose vein in the anterior or medial thigh originates off the anterior accessory great saphenous vein or the great saphenous veins. If either one of these veins are leaking, it should be sealed before or at the time of treatment of the varicose vein. Otherwise, recurrence of the varicosity or development of another is almost certain. Whether the varicose vein is treated with microphlebectomy or injection sclerotherapy is up to the treating physician. Surgeons would be more likely to remove it through a few small incisions (microphlebectomy), whereas other non-surgically trained physicians might opt to inject it. Do your homework.

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Answered by Vein Specialists

I would suggest a diagnostic ultrasound to identify the source of the varicose vein. Typically, a varicose vein in the anterior or medial thigh originates off the anterior accessory great saphenous vein or the great saphenous veins. If either one of these veins are leaking, it should be sealed before or at the time of treatment of the varicose vein. Otherwise, recurrence of the varicosity or development of another is almost certain. Whether the varicose vein is treated with microphlebectomy or injection sclerotherapy is up to the treating physician. Surgeons would be more likely to remove it through a few small incisions (microphlebectomy), whereas other non-surgically trained physicians might opt to inject it. Do your homework.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Intermountain Vein Center

Published on Mar 14, 2013

If the vein bulges, then sclerotherapy will probably not be an option. It would be better to have it taken out via ambulatory phlebectomy. Sclerotherapy will cause staining in the vein and make the bulging vein hard and clot for quite awhile. It is better to take out the problematic veins you can see and inject the deeper veins that you cannot see or feel.

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Answered by Intermountain Vein Center

If the vein bulges, then sclerotherapy will probably not be an option. It would be better to have it taken out via ambulatory phlebectomy. Sclerotherapy will cause staining in the vein and make the bulging vein hard and clot for quite awhile. It is better to take out the problematic veins you can see and inject the deeper veins that you cannot see or feel.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Americas Vein Centers - Southborough

Published on Mar 14, 2013

It sounds like you are a candidate for laser surgery. However, this cannot be determined unless you consult with a vein specialist. After a thorough evaluation, he or she can recommend the most appropriate treatment based on you specific condition.

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Answered by Americas Vein Centers - Southborough

It sounds like you are a candidate for laser surgery. However, this cannot be determined unless you consult with a vein specialist. After a thorough evaluation, he or she can recommend the most appropriate treatment based on you specific condition.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vanish Vein and Laser Center

Published on Mar 14, 2013

Sclerotherapy can be done for this but may require multiple procedures. Most physicians in this country will treat saphenous vein incompetence with a laser or radiofrequency closure procedure. Both carry a high success rate. Varicose veins can then be treated by sclerotherapy or microphlebectomies. You need to know if you have reflux before the vein is treated.

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Answered by Vanish Vein and Laser Center

Sclerotherapy can be done for this but may require multiple procedures. Most physicians in this country will treat saphenous vein incompetence with a laser or radiofrequency closure procedure. Both carry a high success rate. Varicose veins can then be treated by sclerotherapy or microphlebectomies. You need to know if you have reflux before the vein is treated.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Bella MD Laser Vein and Aesthetic Center

Published on Mar 14, 2013

Sclerotherapy is only good for small spider veins. Phlebectomy, foam sclerotherapy or EVLT are needed for larger veins.

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Answered by Bella MD Laser Vein and Aesthetic Center

Sclerotherapy is only good for small spider veins. Phlebectomy, foam sclerotherapy or EVLT are needed for larger veins.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Cosmetic Vein Centers of Texas

Published on Mar 14, 2013

You actually need an ultrasound evaluation first before treatment is recommended.

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Answered by Cosmetic Vein Centers of Texas

You actually need an ultrasound evaluation first before treatment is recommended.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Heart and Vein Center

Published on Mar 14, 2013

It will depend on the size of the vein, as well as other variables. Your best option is to be seen by a vein specialist. Have a full evaluatio, including an ultrasound of the veins in the leg. This will determine the best course of action.

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Answered by Heart and Vein Center

It will depend on the size of the vein, as well as other variables. Your best option is to be seen by a vein specialist. Have a full evaluatio, including an ultrasound of the veins in the leg. This will determine the best course of action.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Advanced Vein Center

Published on Mar 14, 2013

Sclerotherapy may be an option, but the only way to truly know is to get an ultrasound and consult with a specialist.

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Answered by Advanced Vein Center

Sclerotherapy may be an option, but the only way to truly know is to get an ultrasound and consult with a specialist.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


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