Can I wear normal stockings and get the same benefits of compression stockings?

I have tight stockings. Can I wear them and get the same benefits as compression stockings? I just had my gallbladder removed. The compression stockings provided to me by the hospital have gripped soles and an opening on top of the foot, which makes it really difficult to put on shoes.

Answers from doctors (48)


Vein Specialties of St. Louis

Published on Apr 22, 2019

Medical hose are graduated compression with the tighter part over foot and ankle. Regular hose are not and you should avoid anything tight around your abdomen

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Answered by Vein Specialties of St. Louis

Medical hose are graduated compression with the tighter part over foot and ankle. Regular hose are not and you should avoid anything tight around your abdomen

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Center of Louisiana

Published on Jan 22, 2015

Graduated compression of 15-20 mmHg is great for everyday. We prescribe 20-30 mmHg for our patients post-procedure to decrease swelling & the risk of blood clots. These are available on some online websites w/o a Rx.

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Answered by Vein Center of Louisiana

Graduated compression of 15-20 mmHg is great for everyday. We prescribe 20-30 mmHg for our patients post-procedure to decrease swelling & the risk of blood clots. These are available on some online websites w/o a Rx.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Elmore Medical Vein & Laser Treatment Center

Published on Jan 20, 2015

The short answer is no. Normal stockings are not the same as graduated compression stockings. The stockings you were given after surgery are called TED hose. They are used to prevent blood clots while in bed. Compression stockings used for vein disease are a firm graduated compression designed to improve symptoms, minimize swelling and slow progression of vein disease. They are also recommended after vein treatments. There are many options now available in multiple styles and colors

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Answered by Elmore Medical Vein & Laser Treatment Center

The short answer is no. Normal stockings are not the same as graduated compression stockings. The stockings you were given after surgery are called TED hose. They are used to prevent blood clots while in bed. Compression stockings used for vein disease are a firm graduated compression designed to improve symptoms, minimize swelling and slow progression of vein disease. They are also recommended after vein treatments. There are many options now available in multiple styles and colors

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Treatment Institute of NJ

Published on Jan 20, 2015

The compression stockings provided by the hospital are anti-thrombotic (designed to help prevent blood clots) and not designed to treat swelling or varicose veins in an ambulatory outpatient.
Medical grade graduated compression stockings are designed specifically for swelling or varicose veins. They have tapered compression that is greatest at the foot/ankle and decreases as you approach the knee. These need to be prescribed by a medical professional and measured to fit you properly. Regular dress stockings do not provide adequate compression for most patients.

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Answered by Vein Treatment Institute of NJ

The compression stockings provided by the hospital are anti-thrombotic (designed to help prevent blood clots) and not designed to treat swelling or varicose veins in an ambulatory outpatient.
Medical grade graduated compression stockings are designed specifically for swelling or varicose veins. They have tapered compression that is greatest at the foot/ankle and decreases as you approach the knee. These need to be prescribed by a medical professional and measured to fit you properly. Regular dress stockings do not provide adequate compression for most patients.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Care of New Mexico

Published on Jan 20, 2015

I attempted to answer this question with some info on compression stockings and I'm only given a limited amount of space. I do apologize. Since I am unsure what compression your doctors want you to have, I would have to recommend that you call the doctor who told you to wear the compression stockings originally (it may be the surgeon or your primary care MD) and ask them if it is okay. I hope this is helpful and good luck.

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Answered by Vein Care of New Mexico

I attempted to answer this question with some info on compression stockings and I'm only given a limited amount of space. I do apologize. Since I am unsure what compression your doctors want you to have, I would have to recommend that you call the doctor who told you to wear the compression stockings originally (it may be the surgeon or your primary care MD) and ask them if it is okay. I hope this is helpful and good luck.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Flower Mound Vein Center

Published on Jan 19, 2015

No, the stockings given at the hospital are called TED stockings. They are usually only 8-15 mmHG compression. For optimal compression, you would need to be seen by a vein doctor to access what is best for your condition. In our vein practice, we typically prescribe 20-30mmHG compression for patients with venous insufficiency. This is usually after a venous ultrasound to make sure there are no other issues involved. Compression hose come in many styles and forms, including thigh-high and open-toe.

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Answered by Flower Mound Vein Center

No, the stockings given at the hospital are called TED stockings. They are usually only 8-15 mmHG compression. For optimal compression, you would need to be seen by a vein doctor to access what is best for your condition. In our vein practice, we typically prescribe 20-30mmHG compression for patients with venous insufficiency. This is usually after a venous ultrasound to make sure there are no other issues involved. Compression hose come in many styles and forms, including thigh-high and open-toe.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Pittsburgh Vein Center

Published on Jan 19, 2015

Something is better than nothing; however, medical grade compression 30-40 mmHg will improve leg pain and enhance surgical results.

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Answered by Pittsburgh Vein Center

Something is better than nothing; however, medical grade compression 30-40 mmHg will improve leg pain and enhance surgical results.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Eastern Vascular Associates Vein Treatment Center

Published on Jan 19, 2015

Tight stockings are not a replacement for compression stockings. They actually cause a negative effect. Compression stockings are designed to provide graduated compression, which means the pressure is greatest at the ankle and gradually is lessened up the leg. This helps push the blood up the leg, relieving swelling and pooling of blood in the lower extremity. A tight regular stocking prevents the blood from flowing up the leg as the pressure is consistent throughout the stocking.

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Answered by Eastern Vascular Associates Vein Treatment Center

Tight stockings are not a replacement for compression stockings. They actually cause a negative effect. Compression stockings are designed to provide graduated compression, which means the pressure is greatest at the ankle and gradually is lessened up the leg. This helps push the blood up the leg, relieving swelling and pooling of blood in the lower extremity. A tight regular stocking prevents the blood from flowing up the leg as the pressure is consistent throughout the stocking.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Thomas R. Elliott, MD

Published on Jan 18, 2015

Our current understanding of the benefits of compression therapy in terms of improving venous circulation and outflow from the lower extremities, emphasizes the graduated nature of the compression woven into a good stocking. Although patients often do not view compression stockings as precise medical instruments, they are actually precisely constructed and manufactured by companies who specialize in these products. The compression is gradually less throughout the stocking. This promotes venous outflow from the lower extremities, increases velocity of flow in the venous system, reduces vein wall stretching, and consequently improves symptoms and reduces the harmful affects of continued venous hypertension in the legs. These effects will only be obtained from a correctly manufactured and correctly fitted stocking designed specifically for this purpose. Consequently, any stocking that is merely "tight" would not necessarily be expected to improve circulation and possibly could make the situation worse.

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Answered by Thomas R. Elliott, MD

Our current understanding of the benefits of compression therapy in terms of improving venous circulation and outflow from the lower extremities, emphasizes the graduated nature of the compression woven into a good stocking. Although patients often do not view compression stockings as precise medical instruments, they are actually precisely constructed and manufactured by companies who specialize in these products. The compression is gradually less throughout the stocking. This promotes venous outflow from the lower extremities, increases velocity of flow in the venous system, reduces vein wall stretching, and consequently improves symptoms and reduces the harmful affects of continued venous hypertension in the legs. These effects will only be obtained from a correctly manufactured and correctly fitted stocking designed specifically for this purpose. Consequently, any stocking that is merely "tight" would not necessarily be expected to improve circulation and possibly could make the situation worse.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Morrison Vein Institute

Published on Jan 18, 2015

Medical graduated compression stockings come in all different strengths, but they are manufactured specifically to be tighter at the ankles and have less pressure gradually up the leg. The ones they usually give after surgery are to prevent blood clots. They are called TED socks and are not very stylish. They are especially for bed rest or lying around recovering and are not like some elastic stockings because they only feel good when lying down.

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Answered by Morrison Vein Institute

Medical graduated compression stockings come in all different strengths, but they are manufactured specifically to be tighter at the ankles and have less pressure gradually up the leg. The ones they usually give after surgery are to prevent blood clots. They are called TED socks and are not very stylish. They are especially for bed rest or lying around recovering and are not like some elastic stockings because they only feel good when lying down.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Destin Vein Center

Published on Jan 17, 2015

I think you have something mixed up. An opening on top of the foot? What the hospital probably gave you was TED hose. This is only beneficial when you are recumbent, not standing. Unless you are at high risk, simply walking several times a day is probably sufficient.

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Answered by Destin Vein Center

I think you have something mixed up. An opening on top of the foot? What the hospital probably gave you was TED hose. This is only beneficial when you are recumbent, not standing. Unless you are at high risk, simply walking several times a day is probably sufficient.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vascular Medicine Center

Published on Jan 17, 2015

The compression provided by the stockings you have may not be enough I am afraid. You need stockings with at least 20 to 30 mmHg to be effective. As a matter of fact, the stockings given to you from the hospital are not tight enough either. They have hardly 10 mmHg of compression. By the way, the opening you are referring to should go below the foot on the sole side!

Mehul Shah, M.D.
Vascular Medicine Center,
170 N. Henderson road, Suite #302
King of Prussia, PA 19406
610-265-8700

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Answered by Vascular Medicine Center

The compression provided by the stockings you have may not be enough I am afraid. You need stockings with at least 20 to 30 mmHg to be effective. As a matter of fact, the stockings given to you from the hospital are not tight enough either. They have hardly 10 mmHg of compression. By the way, the opening you are referring to should go below the foot on the sole side!

Mehul Shah, M.D.
Vascular Medicine Center,
170 N. Henderson road, Suite #302
King of Prussia, PA 19406
610-265-8700

Published on Jul 11, 2012


More About Doctor St. Louis Vein Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Unfortunately, tight stockings do not provide the same benefits as graduated medical grade compression stockings. The medical grade stockings provide specific compression, which gradually decreases up the length of the leg.

Answered by St. Louis Vein Center (View Profile)

Unfortunately, tight stockings do not provide the same benefits as graduated medical grade compression stockings. The medical grade stockings provide specific compression, which gradually decreases up the length of the leg.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


There is no need to wear either of your stockings if you are able to get out of the bed and move around. If you do feel, however, you need to wear compression stockings, the ones provided by the hospital are 8 to 12 mmHg and can be purchased at a pharmacy with no prescription and closed toe. Knee-high should be as good as your thigh-highs. Their size is based on narrowest circumference of your leg at the ankle level and the widest one at the level of your calf. Good luck!

Answered by New York Vein Treatment Center (View Profile)

There is no need to wear either of your stockings if you are able to get out of the bed and move around. If you do feel, however, you need to wear compression stockings, the ones provided by the hospital are 8 to 12 mmHg and can be purchased at a pharmacy with no prescription and closed toe. Knee-high should be as good as your thigh-highs. Their size is based on narrowest circumference of your leg at the ankle level and the widest one at the level of your calf. Good luck!

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Wearing compression stockings of at least 15 to 20 mmHg of pressure will give you some benefit for DVT prophylaxis.

Answered by Vascular Center and Vein Clinic of Southern Indiana (View Profile)

Wearing compression stockings of at least 15 to 20 mmHg of pressure will give you some benefit for DVT prophylaxis.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Treatment and Aesthetic Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Compression hose are made specifically to assist in moving blood up the leg and back the heart. Regular stockings do not do this. There are many varieties of compression hose to choose from that might fit your legs better than the ones given to you at the hospital. Go to see a vein specialist for the assistance you need.

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Answered by Vein Treatment and Aesthetic Center

Compression hose are made specifically to assist in moving blood up the leg and back the heart. Regular stockings do not do this. There are many varieties of compression hose to choose from that might fit your legs better than the ones given to you at the hospital. Go to see a vein specialist for the assistance you need.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


The Sheen Vein Institute

Published on Jan 16, 2015

The compression stockings that people receive from their doctors/hospitals are typically graduated compression stockings. What this means is that the amount of compression the stocking offers is greatest at the toes and gradually decreases as you go up the leg. Normal stockings typically do not offer this graduated effect. Instead, the amount of compression offered in a normal stocking is the same whether at the toes or at the top of the stocking, which provides no benefit.

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Answered by The Sheen Vein Institute

The compression stockings that people receive from their doctors/hospitals are typically graduated compression stockings. What this means is that the amount of compression the stocking offers is greatest at the toes and gradually decreases as you go up the leg. Normal stockings typically do not offer this graduated effect. Instead, the amount of compression offered in a normal stocking is the same whether at the toes or at the top of the stocking, which provides no benefit.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Center of New Mexico

Published on Jan 16, 2015

The TED hose that are provided by the hospital are for non-ambulatory patients to prevent blood clots. Unfortunately, for patients who are active it does not help at all. Graduated knee-high compression socks are helpful in 15-20 mmHg for everyday use. I hope this information is helpful.

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Answered by Vein Center of New Mexico

The TED hose that are provided by the hospital are for non-ambulatory patients to prevent blood clots. Unfortunately, for patients who are active it does not help at all. Graduated knee-high compression socks are helpful in 15-20 mmHg for everyday use. I hope this information is helpful.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Smith Vein Institute, LLC

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Unfortunately, no. Unlike regular stockings, medical grade compression stockings are designed to deliver a graduated increase in pressure from the top of the stocking to the foot, so that the highest pressure is at the ankle. This way, the blood is essentially pushed up and out your leg and reduces the amount of blood that can accumulate in the venous system. With regular stockings, the blood can become "trapped" in the lower portion of your leg worsening the condition.

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Answered by Smith Vein Institute, LLC

Unfortunately, no. Unlike regular stockings, medical grade compression stockings are designed to deliver a graduated increase in pressure from the top of the stocking to the foot, so that the highest pressure is at the ankle. This way, the blood is essentially pushed up and out your leg and reduces the amount of blood that can accumulate in the venous system. With regular stockings, the blood can become "trapped" in the lower portion of your leg worsening the condition.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


NE Laser Vein Institute LLC

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Regular stockings, even when tight, will not be effective. Compression stockings can be bought without the gripped soles. Most pharmacies sell these compression stockings and there are different brands like Carolon, Mediven, Sigvarus. I hope this information is helpful.

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Answered by NE Laser Vein Institute LLC

Regular stockings, even when tight, will not be effective. Compression stockings can be bought without the gripped soles. Most pharmacies sell these compression stockings and there are different brands like Carolon, Mediven, Sigvarus. I hope this information is helpful.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Aesthetic Vascular Associates

Published on Jan 16, 2015

We hope you are recovering well from your gallbladder surgery. Medical grade compression stockings do differ from over-the-counter compression stockings. Medical grade stockings are recommended to prevent and assist with the treatment of venous disease.

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Answered by Aesthetic Vascular Associates

We hope you are recovering well from your gallbladder surgery. Medical grade compression stockings do differ from over-the-counter compression stockings. Medical grade stockings are recommended to prevent and assist with the treatment of venous disease.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


More About Doctor Nelson R. Maldonado, M.D.

Published on Jan 16, 2015

You do not get the same benefits by wearing normal stockings as you do by wearing compression stockings. Compression stockings are properly fitted to your legs. They are built to create a steady and consistent gradient pressure from your ankle to your thigh. They are designed to help your leg muscles empty your veins more efficiently and quicker, to help remove excess fluid or edema from your legs. They are also worn to decrease the occurrence of blood clots in your deep muscle veins.

Answered by Nelson R. Maldonado, M.D. (View Profile)

You do not get the same benefits by wearing normal stockings as you do by wearing compression stockings. Compression stockings are properly fitted to your legs. They are built to create a steady and consistent gradient pressure from your ankle to your thigh. They are designed to help your leg muscles empty your veins more efficiently and quicker, to help remove excess fluid or edema from your legs. They are also worn to decrease the occurrence of blood clots in your deep muscle veins.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


The purpose of compression following surgery is to help prevent clots that can be a result of a surgical procedure. Regular stockings, even tight ones, are no match for true compression stockings or socks if they are 20-30 mmHg or greater. In general, we would recommend you get true compression stockings.

Answered by Advanced Vein & Vascular Center Inc. (View Profile)

The purpose of compression following surgery is to help prevent clots that can be a result of a surgical procedure. Regular stockings, even tight ones, are no match for true compression stockings or socks if they are 20-30 mmHg or greater. In general, we would recommend you get true compression stockings.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Cleveland Clinic

Published on Jan 16, 2015

The stockings provided by the hospital are probably not intended to be worn inside shoes. Any brand of graded compression stocking that you are comfortable wearing will be fine. The intent is to prevent clots in the calf vein. External compression with stockings may be helpful. However, it is important to exercise your calf muscles by alternating plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the your feet. By that I mean waiving your feet up and down while sitting or lying down. This action propels blood through the veins and prevents blood clots. This form of exercise can be done as frequently as you wish. It is also useful to perform this exercise during long car trips or plane trips to prevent blood clots. Staying well hydrated is also beneficial.

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Answered by Cleveland Clinic

The stockings provided by the hospital are probably not intended to be worn inside shoes. Any brand of graded compression stocking that you are comfortable wearing will be fine. The intent is to prevent clots in the calf vein. External compression with stockings may be helpful. However, it is important to exercise your calf muscles by alternating plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the your feet. By that I mean waiving your feet up and down while sitting or lying down. This action propels blood through the veins and prevents blood clots. This form of exercise can be done as frequently as you wish. It is also useful to perform this exercise during long car trips or plane trips to prevent blood clots. Staying well hydrated is also beneficial.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


More About Doctor Metropolitan Vein Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

It all depends on why you are wearing them and the compression of the stocking you require, which is measured in mmHg. If your intention is to prevent a deep vein thrombosis and you are already walking around, you probably only need 15 mmHg of compression. If you want to prevent or treat varicose veins, you should be using a stocking with 25-30 mmHg compression. Generally, a regular sock or stocking is <15 mmHg of compression. However, sometimes anything is better than nothing. You should speak to your treating physician about this.

Answered by Metropolitan Vein Center (View Profile)

It all depends on why you are wearing them and the compression of the stocking you require, which is measured in mmHg. If your intention is to prevent a deep vein thrombosis and you are already walking around, you probably only need 15 mmHg of compression. If you want to prevent or treat varicose veins, you should be using a stocking with 25-30 mmHg compression. Generally, a regular sock or stocking is <15 mmHg of compression. However, sometimes anything is better than nothing. You should speak to your treating physician about this.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Great question! Actually, the stockings you get at the hospital are useful when you are laying in bed. However, they do not work when you are standing up. You need a prescription-strength compression hose that is made to help blood circulate out of the legs and back to the heart while you are standing.

Answered by The Vein And Vascular Institute of Tampa Bay (View Profile)

Great question! Actually, the stockings you get at the hospital are useful when you are laying in bed. However, they do not work when you are standing up. You need a prescription-strength compression hose that is made to help blood circulate out of the legs and back to the heart while you are standing.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Intermountain Vein Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Unfortunately, your tight stockings will not have the same therapeutic effect. Compression stockings provide graduated compression; meaning, the compression is tighter at the ankle than it is at the top of the stocking. This helps move blood up and out of the legs and back to the heart. There are different styles and options for compression leg wear that may work better for you. You may find different styles of compression stockings at home medical supply stores, some pharmacies and online.

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Answered by Intermountain Vein Center

Unfortunately, your tight stockings will not have the same therapeutic effect. Compression stockings provide graduated compression; meaning, the compression is tighter at the ankle than it is at the top of the stocking. This helps move blood up and out of the legs and back to the heart. There are different styles and options for compression leg wear that may work better for you. You may find different styles of compression stockings at home medical supply stores, some pharmacies and online.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Compression stockings are graded for pressure to reduce the venous reflux resulting in symptom relief, whereas the normal stockings are not. Use medium-strength compression stockings because they may be a bit easier to put on. Also, a nice trick is to use dish-washing gloves to apply them; it provides a stronger grip and makes it a lot easier. Hope that helps.

Answered by Dr. Syed Bokhari M.D., F.A.C.C. (View Profile)

Compression stockings are graded for pressure to reduce the venous reflux resulting in symptom relief, whereas the normal stockings are not. Use medium-strength compression stockings because they may be a bit easier to put on. Also, a nice trick is to use dish-washing gloves to apply them; it provides a stronger grip and makes it a lot easier. Hope that helps.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vanish Vein and Laser Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Compression stockings function by applying pressure to the calf muscles to increase the venous return to the heart and reduce the pressure in the veins. Graduated compression stockings have higher compression at the ankle than at the knee. Tight stockings probably would suffice for what you need post-gallbladder surgery, but would not be sufficient for treating venous problems.

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Answered by Vanish Vein and Laser Center

Compression stockings function by applying pressure to the calf muscles to increase the venous return to the heart and reduce the pressure in the veins. Graduated compression stockings have higher compression at the ankle than at the knee. Tight stockings probably would suffice for what you need post-gallbladder surgery, but would not be sufficient for treating venous problems.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Advanced Vein Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

No, you can't; they are not the same. The ones from the hospital might not be right either. You need a "graduated" compression hose.

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Answered by Advanced Vein Center

No, you can't; they are not the same. The ones from the hospital might not be right either. You need a "graduated" compression hose.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


More About Doctor East Bay Cardio

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Unlike traditional dress or athletic stockings and socks, compression stockings use stronger elastics to create significant pressure on the legs, ankles and feet. Compression stockings are tightest at the ankles and gradually become less constrictive towards the knees and thighs. By compressing the surface veins, arteries and muscles, the circulating blood is forced through narrower circulatory channels.

Answered by East Bay Cardio (View Profile)

Unlike traditional dress or athletic stockings and socks, compression stockings use stronger elastics to create significant pressure on the legs, ankles and feet. Compression stockings are tightest at the ankles and gradually become less constrictive towards the knees and thighs. By compressing the surface veins, arteries and muscles, the circulating blood is forced through narrower circulatory channels.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


More About Doctor Vanishing Veins Northwest

Published on Jan 16, 2015

This is a common and great question! Contrary to popular belief, compression stockings are not equal to tight stockings. Compression stockings are made to provide a gradual compression over the leg. Because of this, compression stockings are not sized like regular stockings. When sizing compression stockings, the ankle, calf and sometimes the thigh and inseam are measured to determine your specific size. Regular stocking sizes are typically based on your height and weight. Another factor to consider is that compression stockings also come in different measures of pressure, which can range from 8mmHg to 40mmHg. Typically, one may think the more compression is better! However, more pressure can actually cause a decrease in arterial flow to the leg, which is bad. This is why it is advised for anyone to see their healthcare provider to determine how much pressure in a compression stocking is ideal for them.

Specific to your situation, I would contact your surgeon and inform them of your situation with the stockings. After surgery, the use of compression stockings is very important as it can prevent the development of deep vein thrombosis, which can be life-threatening. Your provider should be able to guide you to a solution.

Answered by Vanishing Veins Northwest (View Profile)

This is a common and great question! Contrary to popular belief, compression stockings are not equal to tight stockings. Compression stockings are made to provide a gradual compression over the leg. Because of this, compression stockings are not sized like regular stockings. When sizing compression stockings, the ankle, calf and sometimes the thigh and inseam are measured to determine your specific size. Regular stocking sizes are typically based on your height and weight. Another factor to consider is that compression stockings also come in different measures of pressure, which can range from 8mmHg to 40mmHg. Typically, one may think the more compression is better! However, more pressure can actually cause a decrease in arterial flow to the leg, which is bad. This is why it is advised for anyone to see their healthcare provider to determine how much pressure in a compression stocking is ideal for them.

Specific to your situation, I would contact your surgeon and inform them of your situation with the stockings. After surgery, the use of compression stockings is very important as it can prevent the development of deep vein thrombosis, which can be life-threatening. Your provider should be able to guide you to a solution.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


ProActive Heart & Vascular

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Tight stockings will not offer the same benefits as compression stockings. Most compression stockings do not have the gripped soles, and usually you can easily find both open-toe and closed-toe stockings available. We suggest you get fitted for appropriate compression stockings that have the features that you want and need.

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Answered by ProActive Heart & Vascular

Tight stockings will not offer the same benefits as compression stockings. Most compression stockings do not have the gripped soles, and usually you can easily find both open-toe and closed-toe stockings available. We suggest you get fitted for appropriate compression stockings that have the features that you want and need.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Legacy Vein Clinic

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Our practice recommends compression stockings with a gradient of 30-40 mmHg from thigh to ankle for the best conservative therapy and treatment results. If you are only interested in cosmetic spider vein injections (sclerotherapy), then you may use 20-30mmHg grade compression.

Some of our patients do cut the toe off at the end of the stocking for comfort and ease of use. This is acceptable for our clinic purposes, but check with the physician that prescribed your stockings before altering.

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Answered by Legacy Vein Clinic

Our practice recommends compression stockings with a gradient of 30-40 mmHg from thigh to ankle for the best conservative therapy and treatment results. If you are only interested in cosmetic spider vein injections (sclerotherapy), then you may use 20-30mmHg grade compression.

Some of our patients do cut the toe off at the end of the stocking for comfort and ease of use. This is acceptable for our clinic purposes, but check with the physician that prescribed your stockings before altering.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Lakeshore Veins and Wellness

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Tight stockings and graduated compression stockings are not the same. Graduated compression stockings put more compression at the ankle, with less in the calf and even less in the thigh. The graduated compression helps push the blood forward towards the heart. There are multiple brands and types of compression stockings that can fit every need. We recommend you be fitted by a stocking fitter. Many pharmacies carry compression stockings and can help you.

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Answered by Lakeshore Veins and Wellness

Tight stockings and graduated compression stockings are not the same. Graduated compression stockings put more compression at the ankle, with less in the calf and even less in the thigh. The graduated compression helps push the blood forward towards the heart. There are multiple brands and types of compression stockings that can fit every need. We recommend you be fitted by a stocking fitter. Many pharmacies carry compression stockings and can help you.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


VeinCare Centers of Tennessee

Published on Jan 16, 2015

The stockings you describe are NOT graduated compression stockings and are not intended to function as compression stockings. They are "anti-embolism" stockings, which are designed to reduce the risk of formation of clots in the deep veins of the lower extremities when one is inactive in bed or on an operating table. They do not provide adequate pressure to serve as compression hose, and the pressure is not graduated to make up for the force of gravity on your veins when you sit or stand.

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Answered by VeinCare Centers of Tennessee

The stockings you describe are NOT graduated compression stockings and are not intended to function as compression stockings. They are "anti-embolism" stockings, which are designed to reduce the risk of formation of clots in the deep veins of the lower extremities when one is inactive in bed or on an operating table. They do not provide adequate pressure to serve as compression hose, and the pressure is not graduated to make up for the force of gravity on your veins when you sit or stand.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Midwest Vein Center - Downers Grove

Published on Jan 16, 2015

The compression stockings that are given to patients to prevent a deep vein blood clot following surgery usually have a compression of 8-18 mmHg, which is not as high of compression as the stockings that are prescribed for patients with varicose veins and symptoms of venous insufficiency. However, companies who sell medical grade compression stockings also offer stockings in compression levels similar to the one you were given at the hospital in styles that may better suit your needs.

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Answered by Midwest Vein Center - Downers Grove

The compression stockings that are given to patients to prevent a deep vein blood clot following surgery usually have a compression of 8-18 mmHg, which is not as high of compression as the stockings that are prescribed for patients with varicose veins and symptoms of venous insufficiency. However, companies who sell medical grade compression stockings also offer stockings in compression levels similar to the one you were given at the hospital in styles that may better suit your needs.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Beach Cities Vein and Laser Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Unfortunately, normal stockings will not provide nearly the support or assist in blood flow as compression stockings. The stockings have built-in elasticity that help the blood flow normally in veins. Regular stockings are not built with the same elasticity. Compression stockings come in different strengths, lengths and sizes. The right stocking for you is dependent on your condition, and size is important. You should be measured to get the right compression.

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Answered by Beach Cities Vein and Laser Center

Unfortunately, normal stockings will not provide nearly the support or assist in blood flow as compression stockings. The stockings have built-in elasticity that help the blood flow normally in veins. Regular stockings are not built with the same elasticity. Compression stockings come in different strengths, lengths and sizes. The right stocking for you is dependent on your condition, and size is important. You should be measured to get the right compression.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Mindful Medical

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Medical grade compression stockings are graded and offer various pressure options. Your over-the-counter stocking is not graded and has an unknown compression rating. After surgery, the reason you are asked to wear compression is because of decreased activity, which may make you more prone to the development of venous clot formation. If post-operatively you are an active person, walking often and performing normal daily activities, then the compression may not be necessary.

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Answered by Mindful Medical

Medical grade compression stockings are graded and offer various pressure options. Your over-the-counter stocking is not graded and has an unknown compression rating. After surgery, the reason you are asked to wear compression is because of decreased activity, which may make you more prone to the development of venous clot formation. If post-operatively you are an active person, walking often and performing normal daily activities, then the compression may not be necessary.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Long Island Vein Care

Published on Jan 16, 2015

You will not get the same benefits from tight stockings. There is no way you can know if they are providing the appropriate compression. You need to consult your surgeon or primary care physician to prescribe stockings with the best compression for your needs. With the variation in styles from all the different manufacturers, I am sure you will be able to find a stocking that will not pose any problem to put on shoes.

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Answered by Long Island Vein Care

You will not get the same benefits from tight stockings. There is no way you can know if they are providing the appropriate compression. You need to consult your surgeon or primary care physician to prescribe stockings with the best compression for your needs. With the variation in styles from all the different manufacturers, I am sure you will be able to find a stocking that will not pose any problem to put on shoes.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Ross T. Lyon, MD, FACS

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Compression stockings help direct blood flow back to the heart and are used to alleviate some symptoms from varicose and spider veins, like pain and swelling, and to complement venous procedures, i.e. sclerotherapy, EVLT's, etc. To receive the benefits of compression stockings, they should be a medical grade compression level of 20-30 mmHg or higher. The stockings you received from the hospital may not meet this level, but you should check on the inside tag to be sure.

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Answered by Ross T. Lyon, MD, FACS

Compression stockings help direct blood flow back to the heart and are used to alleviate some symptoms from varicose and spider veins, like pain and swelling, and to complement venous procedures, i.e. sclerotherapy, EVLT's, etc. To receive the benefits of compression stockings, they should be a medical grade compression level of 20-30 mmHg or higher. The stockings you received from the hospital may not meet this level, but you should check on the inside tag to be sure.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Lincoln Surgical Group

Published on Jan 16, 2015

This all depends on if you have varicose veins and/or venous insufficiency. If you don't, the stockings that you have are just fine. If you do have either or both of these problems, then you need compressions stockings that are 30-40 mmhg in compression; they are a prescription from your doctor.

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Answered by Lincoln Surgical Group

This all depends on if you have varicose veins and/or venous insufficiency. If you don't, the stockings that you have are just fine. If you do have either or both of these problems, then you need compressions stockings that are 30-40 mmhg in compression; they are a prescription from your doctor.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


North Shore Vein Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Regular stockings will not work the same. The stockings that you need are both firmer than regular stockings and are always graded. Grading means that the hose are tighter at the ankle and loosen as they proceed up to the calf. This is the best way to improve circulation and keep leg swelling to a minimum. The stockings you require must be graded and custom-fitted, so that they can be perfectly fitted to your body's dimensions.

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Answered by North Shore Vein Center

Regular stockings will not work the same. The stockings that you need are both firmer than regular stockings and are always graded. Grading means that the hose are tighter at the ankle and loosen as they proceed up to the calf. This is the best way to improve circulation and keep leg swelling to a minimum. The stockings you require must be graded and custom-fitted, so that they can be perfectly fitted to your body's dimensions.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Daniels Vein and Cosmetic Center

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Yes, as long as you have some kind of tightness in the stocking, it will do the same job. I usually tell our patients to wear a strength that they are comfortable wearing, as long as they wear them.

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Answered by Daniels Vein and Cosmetic Center

Yes, as long as you have some kind of tightness in the stocking, it will do the same job. I usually tell our patients to wear a strength that they are comfortable wearing, as long as they wear them.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Center for Interventional Medicine, LLC

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Those stockings from the hospital are designed for deep vein thrombosis (DVT, or "blood clot") prevention. They are of a lower strength than the compression stockings that are usually used after varicose vein or spider vein procedures. The stockings for vein procedures are usually at least 20 to 30 mmHg (millimeters mercury) in strength.

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Answered by Center for Interventional Medicine, LLC

Those stockings from the hospital are designed for deep vein thrombosis (DVT, or "blood clot") prevention. They are of a lower strength than the compression stockings that are usually used after varicose vein or spider vein procedures. The stockings for vein procedures are usually at least 20 to 30 mmHg (millimeters mercury) in strength.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


The compression stockings for vein disease are specifically made to help blood return from the legs to the heart. Their pressure is graduated from 20-30 mmHg or higher. None of the non-prescription stockings available in stores over the counter have that level of compression. So, medical grade compression stockings are needed for real benefit for venous disease. Thank you.

Answered by Premier Vein and Vascular Center (View Profile)

The compression stockings for vein disease are specifically made to help blood return from the legs to the heart. Their pressure is graduated from 20-30 mmHg or higher. None of the non-prescription stockings available in stores over the counter have that level of compression. So, medical grade compression stockings are needed for real benefit for venous disease. Thank you.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


The Kimmel Institute

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Prescription compression hose are made to a higher standard than regular "tight stockings." It is important to wear these graded compression hose because of the progressive nature of the design and the scientifically proven benefits that result. Your regular stockings may be acceptable for an evening out or a particular social event; however, for the actual management of venous reflux disease, they will not have the same effect. The hose from the hospital are likely "anti-embolism" stockings.

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Answered by The Kimmel Institute

Prescription compression hose are made to a higher standard than regular "tight stockings." It is important to wear these graded compression hose because of the progressive nature of the design and the scientifically proven benefits that result. Your regular stockings may be acceptable for an evening out or a particular social event; however, for the actual management of venous reflux disease, they will not have the same effect. The hose from the hospital are likely "anti-embolism" stockings.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Georgia Vascular Institute

Published on Jan 16, 2015

Typically, normal stockings only provide a mild compression compared to actual compression stockings. To get the true benefits look for a minimum of 15-20 mmHg compression. As the compression goes up, the more you will notice the benefits. You can always start at 15-20 mmHg and progress up as well. Of course, the higher the compression the more difficult it will be to put on. Note that compression stockings of 40-50 mmHg are only recommended in severe cases of venous insufficiency and should be worn under the guidance of a specialist.

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Answered by Georgia Vascular Institute

Typically, normal stockings only provide a mild compression compared to actual compression stockings. To get the true benefits look for a minimum of 15-20 mmHg compression. As the compression goes up, the more you will notice the benefits. You can always start at 15-20 mmHg and progress up as well. Of course, the higher the compression the more difficult it will be to put on. Note that compression stockings of 40-50 mmHg are only recommended in severe cases of venous insufficiency and should be worn under the guidance of a specialist.

Published on Jul 11, 2012

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